India will vote in April and May for or against a second term in Modi

Indians will vote from April 11 to May 19, six weeks of parliamentary elections to endow the world's largest democracy with a new prime minister, a function that Narandra Modi is once again fighting against Rahul Gandhi of the dynasty Nehru-Gandhi.

The results must be announced on May 23, said Sunday the electoral commission, which announced the dates of the poll.

"The festival of democracy, this is the elections," tweeted Sunday evening Mr. Modi. "I hope this vote will see a historic participation".

Narendra Modi, 68, of the Hindu nationalist party Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), will seek a second term to lead this country of 1.25 billion people, the second most populous in the world. He will face Rahul Gandhi, 48, son of assassinated Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, of the Congress Party (center left).

From the Himalayas to tropical shores and deserts, some 900 million voters will designate for the next five years the 543 seats of Lok Sabha, the lower house of the Indian Parliament.

The BJP and the Congress, ousted from power in 2014 after having been omnipresent as an emblematic party in the struggle for independence, are the two main forces among the hundreds of parties in the country.

Modi, whose right-wing party won a landslide victory in 2014, remains a popular figure with a certain charisma and sharp language. The BJP remains a well-oiled political machine.

The outgoing prime minister was recently able to revive his nationalistic image in the most serious crisis in India-Pakistan between 14 years ago and a suicide attack that killed some 40 Indian paramilitaries. Indian cashmere.

This attack, the deadliest since the beginning of the separatist insurgency in 1989, was claimed by the Islamist group Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), based in Pakistan. It unleashed an Indian "preemptive strike" against a JeM camp in Pakistan and then air combat - the first in decades - between the two countries. Captured by Pakistan, the pilot of an Indian plane shot down was released on 1 March.

During the crisis, Mr. Modi adopted a martial rhetoric, accusing the opposition of weakness and affirming that his "new India" would give "a fulgurante answer" to the Moslem neighbor.

"We will spare no one who wants to destroy our country even if the leaders are on the other side of the border," he said recently at a meeting in Gujarat (west), a state of which he is a native . "The opposition has a problem with such decisive actions, but I will go ahead and I am determined to uproot terrorism."

The Prime Minister also compliments his modest origins as tea vendor compared to those of Mr. Gandhi, half-Italian and from one of the most famous Indian families, the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty (which does not is not related to Mahatma Gandhi).

However, there is growing discontent with unemployment and inequality. Polls show an erosion of BJP support that may not even reach the threshold of 272 seats needed to form a single government.

"If the BJP fails to form a majority alone, Modi will lose power forever," said Judge Mohan Guruswamy of the Center for Policy Alternatives think tank. "It will be the beginning of the end," he told AFP.

For his part, Rahul Gandhi, a former student of Harvard and Cambridge, long criticized for his lack of charisma, takes on the appearance of a serious opponent. Congress won by surprise three key states in December (Rajashtan, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh). They are part of vast rural areas where the heart of Mr. Modi's constituency is.

These results were largely explained by the lack of improvement in the plight of peasants - thousands of whom have committed suicide in recent years - and the creation of new jobs.

"This election is going to be the evaluation moment of the Modi government," says Gurpreet Mahajan, a professor of political science at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. "They will be a referendum on Modi and the fact that he has kept his promises, or not," he adds.

Source: Seychelles News Agency

Comments are closed.

India will vote in April and May for or against a second term in Modi

Indians will vote from April 11 to May 19, six weeks of parliamentary elections to endow the world's largest democracy with a new prime minister, a function that Narandra Modi is once again fighting against Rahul Gandhi of the dynasty Nehru-Gandhi.

The results must be announced on May 23, said Sunday the electoral commission, which announced the dates of the poll.

"The festival of democracy, this is the elections," tweeted Sunday evening Mr. Modi. "I hope this vote will see a historic participation".

Narendra Modi, 68, of the Hindu nationalist party Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), will seek a second term to lead this country of 1.25 billion people, the second most populous in the world. He will face Rahul Gandhi, 48, son of assassinated Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, of the Congress Party (center left).

From the Himalayas to tropical shores and deserts, some 900 million voters will designate for the next five years the 543 seats of Lok Sabha, the lower house of the Indian Parliament.

The BJP and the Congress, ousted from power in 2014 after having been omnipresent as an emblematic party in the struggle for independence, are the two main forces among the hundreds of parties in the country.

Modi, whose right-wing party won a landslide victory in 2014, remains a popular figure with a certain charisma and sharp language. The BJP remains a well-oiled political machine.

The outgoing prime minister was recently able to revive his nationalistic image in the most serious crisis in India-Pakistan between 14 years ago and a suicide attack that killed some 40 Indian paramilitaries. Indian cashmere.

This attack, the deadliest since the beginning of the separatist insurgency in 1989, was claimed by the Islamist group Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), based in Pakistan. It unleashed an Indian "preemptive strike" against a JeM camp in Pakistan and then air combat - the first in decades - between the two countries. Captured by Pakistan, the pilot of an Indian plane shot down was released on 1 March.

During the crisis, Mr. Modi adopted a martial rhetoric, accusing the opposition of weakness and affirming that his "new India" would give "a fulgurante answer" to the Moslem neighbor.

"We will spare no one who wants to destroy our country even if the leaders are on the other side of the border," he said recently at a meeting in Gujarat (west), a state of which he is a native . "The opposition has a problem with such decisive actions, but I will go ahead and I am determined to uproot terrorism."

The Prime Minister also compliments his modest origins as tea vendor compared to those of Mr. Gandhi, half-Italian and from one of the most famous Indian families, the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty (which does not is not related to Mahatma Gandhi).

However, there is growing discontent with unemployment and inequality. Polls show an erosion of BJP support that may not even reach the threshold of 272 seats needed to form a single government.

"If the BJP fails to form a majority alone, Modi will lose power forever," said Judge Mohan Guruswamy of the Center for Policy Alternatives think tank. "It will be the beginning of the end," he told AFP.

For his part, Rahul Gandhi, a former student of Harvard and Cambridge, long criticized for his lack of charisma, takes on the appearance of a serious opponent. Congress won by surprise three key states in December (Rajashtan, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh). They are part of vast rural areas where the heart of Mr. Modi's constituency is.

These results were largely explained by the lack of improvement in the plight of peasants - thousands of whom have committed suicide in recent years - and the creation of new jobs.

"This election is going to be the evaluation moment of the Modi government," says Gurpreet Mahajan, a professor of political science at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. "They will be a referendum on Modi and the fact that he has kept his promises, or not," he adds.

Source: Seychelles News Agency

Comments are closed.