8 facts about the logo of the Seychelles National Assembly

This week the National Assembly of the Seychelles commemorates its 25th anniversary. We take a look at eight parts of the Assembly's logo, which was designed by Seychellois graphic artist Aubrey Adeline in January 2010.

The logo is now displayed above the National Assembly entrance at Ile du Port, on the outskirts of the capital city of Victoria.

The parliament:

The building in the logo represents the National Assembly's new establishment.

The pillars:

The two pillars of the building represent the government and the opposition, supporting the upper part of the building which represents Seychelles and its people.

The Constitution:

The book in the middle represents our Constitution, which is one of the most important tools of the Assembly.

The coco de mer:

The coco de mer, the world's biggest nut found only on the island nation, depicts the uniqueness of the Seychelles islands.

The flag:

The colours of the flag below the building represent diversity and also show that beautiful things come when they are united.

The palm leaves:

The two palm leaves illustrates that there are two sides to many issues, the negative and the positive, and like electricity both negative and positive are needed in order to work.

The Seychelles archipelago:

There are 115 spikes in total on the round edges of the logo. These spikes represent all 115 islands which make up our country.

The round shape:

The logo is designed in a round shape because the Assembly is one of the most important mechanisms in the government, thus the circle with its spikes represents a big mechanical gear.

The year:

The year 1993 represents the birth of the new Assembly of Seychelles.

Source: Seychelles News Agency

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